Tilikum dies at SeaWorld, Orlando


Mixed feelings. Relieved that he no longer suffers, heartbroken that he had to die to be free. Part of me likes to think he knew how important he was in our anti-captivity campaign and, as a loved one comforted me, that he is swimming with the great pod in the sky, wild and free ๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’™

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Empty The Tanks May 7th 2016

My poster is ready for the Empty the Tanks demonstration next Saturday, 7th. I’ll be heading to Leicester Square to join many others in protest of cetacean captivity. We’ve come so far already, but this is far from over.

Whales and dolphins are imprisoned in aquariums all over the world. At least 163 orcas have died in captivity, not including 30 miscarried or still-born calves. My focus on orca captivity started nearly 20 years ago at SeaWorld, Orlando when I was 11. SeaWorld holds 23 orcas in its three parks in the United States and owns (at least) a further four at Loro Parque in Spain. At least forty-five orcas have died at SeaWorld.

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I will be travelling to London from Chelmsford on Saturday morning and wholeheartedly welcome all support ๐Ÿ’™

Enough is enough #emptythetanks

Wild disabled killer whale cared for by its pod

Disabled killer whale

Photo: Rainer Schimpf
Port Elizabeth, South Africa

In anticipation of the killer whale feature on Dolphins – Spy in the Pod tonight on BBC1, I thought Iโ€™d share this with you.

This juvenile killer whale is disabled. He is missing his right pectoral fin and half of his dorsal fin meaning he has difficulty in swimming at times and is unable to hunt. But heโ€™s well looked after by the rest of his pod, who hunt on his behalf, share food and assist him in reaching the surface to breathe when he has difficulty :โ€™)

The majority of other mammals living in family groups would instinctively see a disabled individual as an unsustainable burden that would be unable to contribute to the continuation of the species. But not killer whales, of course.

I have loved these animals since I was a little girl, but they still never cease to entirely amaze me. They, quite simply, do not belong in captivity.